How Your Body Changes During Pregnancy

body changes during pregnancy
The changes a mother-to-be experiences during pregnancy is quite amazing, to say the least. As her body gets ready to support the growing baby in the womb and giving birth to this new life, several subtle and obvious changes take place.
What exactly changes during pregnancy? Well, several things do. To say our bodies are a miraculous thing is an understatement. Pregnancy is the perfect example of our body’s amazing potential.

A few of these changes you can see, while many others you may not even notice. The ones you may not notice happening are the ones that cause many common symptoms of pregnancy. Things like acid reflux, needing to empty your bladder (constantly, it seems?) or feeling short of breath during pregnancy are caused by the changes happening in the respiratory, urinary and gastrointestinal systems.

What Changes During Pregnancy?

Some of these changes are subtle, an increased respiratory rate for example, while other more obvious changes include a baby bump. All these changes occur to prepare for the development of your baby and to give birth during labor. Here are some systems, organs, and parts that undergo changes during pregnancy.

Body Parts That Change While Pregnant

  • Endocrine System
  • Abdomen
  • Cardiovascular System
  • Breast
  • Respiratory System
  • Body Temperature
  • Integumentary System: Hair, Skin and Nails
  • Urinary System
  • Legs and Feet
  • Musculoskeletal System
  • Body Weight

All these changes happen at different points of your pregnancy. The breasts are commonly the first changes most pregnant women notice. The second most recognized sign of pregnancy is the abdomen. The infographic below explains the body changes during pregnancy in more detail perfectly.

If you are interested in learning more about how your body is changing during pregnancy, we recommend signing up for our pregnancy week by week newsletter and reading following amazing pregnancy books.

How a woman’s body changes when she’s pregnant

Prenatal DNA

Anna Taylor

Nutritionist, Mother, Wellness Advocate and APA Communications specialist.